Problem Prenatals…

According to http://www.soundformulas.com, there are 7 major problems with prenatal vitamins.  Poor Quality: Most prenatal vitamins contain poor quality, synthetic forms of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants like an inferior form of B12 called Cyancobalamin (that’s harder on your liver) and the cheap, hard to absorb, Calcium Carbonate. Inadequate Potency: Most have inadequate potency (not enough … Continue reading

Perinatal Depression: Prevalence, Risks, and the Nutrition Link—A Literature Review

Research on the relationship between nutrition and brain function is remarkably large and reaches back almost 90 years.

Alternative Treatments for Postpartum Mood Disorders

Here is an excellent article from Mothering.com that includes great advice from many sources, including Kathleen Kendall-Tackett and PSI president Birdie Meyer. The Pfeiffer Treatment Center in Warrenville, Illinois is especially remarkable for reporting the link between high copper and severe postpartum anxiety issues like postpartum psychosis and postpartum obsessive/compulsive disorder.  Look for an in-depth post … Continue reading

Are Prenatal Vitamins Effective?

This article is a REPRINT, offered to newer readers of WellPostpartum Weblog.  Be sure and read to the bottom for an excellent product resource by Dr. Dean Raffelock of http://www.pregnancyrecovery.com. Recommended Daily Allowances for Pregnant Women Could we have a false sense of security because women use prenatal vitamins?  When I first realized that most commercially-available prenatal vitamins … Continue reading

Study Links High Copper Levels to Postpartum Anxiety Reactions

New research sheds light on what may be an underlying cause of postpartum depression, and may help explain why some women suffer more extreme cases of PPD.

Researchers have identified a pattern of elevated copper levels in the blood of women with a history of the condition. “In our study, we looked at zinc and copper levels in 78 women who suffered from PPD after completed pregnancies, and compared them with a group of 148 mothers without a history of PPD, and also with a group of 28 non-depressed women,” said John Crayton, M.D. Dr. Crayton is a professor of psychiatry at Loyola University

About.com: Minerals and Depression

Deficiencies in a number of minerals can also cause depression.

Magnesium: Deficiency can result in depressive symptoms, along with confusion, agitation, anxiety, and hallucinations, as well as a variety of physical